Whirling Dervish 36 x 36

"This one is my personal favorite. It represents a state of mind I often find myself  in when painting. The Whirling  Dervish
 is spinning toward union with the divine. I feel that union with my connection to color."  

Sue

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Your focus on the emotional possibilities to be realized from the interactions of color, design graphic and truthful execution entitles you to a meaningful place in the history of non-objective painting. That continuum would include works of Malevich, Mondrian, Motherwell, Klein, Gorky, Pollock, Frankenthaler, and a number of living Latin American artists. The lyrical, turbulent action referenced in the works reminds one of the dance performances of Merce Cunningham and the Cirque de Soleil." 

Jury Committee - Columbia Art 

"Composition in Orange stirs many emotions: the awe of standing at the gates of Hades - we found ourselves looking for the ferryman to convey us across the Styx; we were warmed by the elegance of the visual diversions created by pouring; the whack-upside-the-head created by the washes and dilutions that contrasted with the intensity of referent "hot" palette." 
Jury Committee - Columbia Art Gallery

"Guests to Gallery 154 mentioned enjoying your bold use of color and your seeming playfulness. Separate remarks moved 
from the organic, ​to geographic illusions through to suggestions of an outer-space, beginning of the universe theme."
Joycelyn Unity Dana - Administrator, Gallery 154, Fremont District, Seattle, Washington

Jacob Lawrence, a professor at University of Washington School of Art, noticed Sue's unusual approach when she attended his Live Drawing class in the mid-70s. Other students were painstakingly reaching for their most realistic representation of the live nude in the middle of the room. When he looked over Sue's shoulder, Professor Lawrence was surprised and supportive. What he saw was an Egyptian goddess on one side of the head and a Picasso-like face on the other. When Sue told him she knew it was not realistic like everyone else's drawing he asked "Do you like Kandinsky and Picasso, Sue? Don't let anyone change you. Your style is uniquely yours. Follow your own muse." Jacob Lawrence's work can be viewed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC and with the following link: Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Professor Ed Prazakowski of the Univerisity of Washington School of Art once accused Sue of using white in her work as a crutch. She offered to show him the slides she used as a portfolio for admission to the school. He was so impressed with Sue's work that he used the slides as examples in his class to illustrate example of good design, composition and use of color and offered an apology for the accusation. His advice to her was to always continue to expand her style. We are hoping to locate Professor Prazakowski to show him this web site and thank him for his encouragement. 
Professor Alden Mason, another instructor at the Univerisity of Washington School of Art, also used Sue's work as example of good design in his classes. This is a link to Alden Mason's work on the Foster/White Gallery website: Foster/White Gallery
On the other hand, Professor Michael Daily, not one of Sue's favorite instructors, attempted to reign in her style. He told her she "could not use such vivid colors when doing water color work"! She "had to use pastels"! The painting he critiqued was one of the first to be sold. There was never a chance of anyone deterring Sue from expressing what is inside her. We are grateful that she did not take this feedback to heart!
A letter from the administrator of Gallery 154, a fine arts gallery in Fremont Washington



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May 9, 1996
Dear Sue,
Enclosed is a copy of Gallery 154's quest book. We received many compliments from visitors who enjoyed your work. Guests to Gallery 154 mentioned enjoying your bold use of color, movement and your seeming playfulness. Separate remarks moved from the organic, to geographic illusions through to suggestions of an outer-space, beginning of the universe theme. It was a pleasure to work in an environment surrounded by your abstract paintings, listening to the varied interpretations of what people were seeing.
Thank you for allowing us to display your fine work.
Very truly yours,
Jocelyn Unity Dana
Administrator


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A letter from the Jury Committee at The Columbia Art Gallery
January 23, 2009 

Ms. Sue Krigsberg 
Goldendale, WA 98620 

Dear Sue,
After reviewing the works that you have submitted to the Columbia Art Gallery, it is our decision and our pleasure to ask that your work and you join the community of artists of the Columbia Art Gallery. 

Our decision was based on a consideration of the individual works and the overall alluring non-objective theme of your work. Phrases such as "dynamic", "exciting colors and color combinations", "visual sophistication", and "elegance" were mentioned by the Jury Committee. 
Your focus on the emotional possibilities to be realized from the interactions of color, design graphic and truthful execution entitles you to a meaningful place in the history of non-objective painting. That continuum would include works of Malevich, Mondrian, Motherwell, Klein, Gorky, Pollock, Frankenthaler, and a number of living Latin American artists. The lyrical, turbulent action referenced in the works reminds one of the dance performances of Merce Cunningham and the Circe de Soleil. 

Your work "Vortex" was a tour-de-force on the use of red/orange to excite the overall blue, maroon, and cool feeling of a lively work. The "Composition Two" was a celebration to view, with its implied motion, vibrant colors, and the simultaneous contrasts set off with your reds. 
"Purple Bubble" draws one into its sea-foam like abstraction with a combination of visual sophistication and an implied story. The subtle blending of colors reinforced the organic feel of the work. . . a hint of outreaching fingers. "Composition in Orange" stirs many emotions: the awe of standing at the gates of Hades - we found ourselves looking for the ferryman to convey us across the Styx; we were warmed by the elegance of the visual diversions created by pouring; the whack-upside-the-head created by the washes and dilutions that contrasted with the intensity of referent "hot" palette.

"Creation in Color" benefits from your choice of a pleasing way of graphically splitting the canvas, the competition between washes and intense colors, and the powerful juxtaposition of detail and pleasing tones. We found ourselves drawn by the visual details placed against what we felt to be a broader emotional messaging of strong hot colors. 
We look forward to your overall contribution to our family of artists, particularly your passionate pursuit of the emotional messaging of non-objective art. While the issue of scale is one unresolved aspect of the making of great art, we see many possibilities for you in your exploration of the overall size of your works. 

All the best. 
The CAG Jury Committee


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An article in the Sentinel, the local Goldendale, Washington newspaper

Featured artist brings color, emotion to gallery
Sue Krigsberg says painting is sometimes an "out of the body experience."
The Goldendale craftswoman, who is the featured artist at the Golden Art Gallery this month, has been working with art for some time.
This particlular kind of painting, however, which infuses vibrant colors with abstract shapes and texture, began about six years ago, she says.
The colors, she notes, are used to draw in her viewers with forms and depth. "It's fine with me if people sort of see what they want to see," Krigsberg says. "I paint from a certain emotional space and to some people that comes through. Sometimes it's kind of almost where I become the color and the color becomes me."
The artist showcased her work at Second Thursday events last week, which included a wine-tasting with varieties such as Memaloose, Wind River, Maryhill and Wy'East Vineyards.
The artist has 18 pieces on display at her show which will run through November 29th.


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Website Feedback
Oh my GOD, this web site’s paintings just blows me away. I was always (back in the '80's) under the impression that you were just 'playing around' with wild colors.
OK now I'm updated...you are a PRO, what BEAUTY!
Doc 
Sue, 
This morning I had more time, so I opened your web site and sat and enjoyed it along with my Decaf Starbucks. The 4 galleries were most entertaining and a far departure from the painting you gave me years ago.
Your style is so inventive, some are sort of like oil on water with sunlight and waves changing the image...then spraying Simple Green solvent. Morrays, Auroraborialis, Dale Chuhuly glass or putting a fresh canvas on a Potters Wheel while spinning and dropping paint. 
Your paintings can be hung at 180 or 45 or 90 degrees to give new meaning.
Being a typical man I not only see Flower Petals but many Vaginas…(oh my).
Your paintings show that you have infinite control of air gun, gravity and feather brush. I love your work!

YOU, my friend ARE EXCITEMENT IN PAINT !!!! 
Love,
Doc

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Sue, I visited your galleries and was amazed at your masterful use of color and especially enjoyed " A Visitation ". Even when I normally like other types of painting, your use of vivid colors showed real talent and insight.

Rudy Cain

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In Feburary of 1999 Al Gore went to the Metro Transit North Base in Seattle for a meeting with the Puget Sound Regional Council where he presented a large funding for Public Transportaion. He is shown here with Bev Anderson as she presents him with an abstract representation of Gas Works Park by Sue Krigsberg. The Gas Works Park was built on the site of an old gas works plant. They felt this particular painting would honor his dedication to the enviornmental issues. Sue and Bev have a letter of thanks sent to them by Tipper Gore.

















Sue's work has been shown at the following venues:

EXHIBITIONS
1965
Bellevue Art Show, Bellevue WA - recieved Honorable Mention 
1972
Anacortes Art Show, Anacortes, WA
1979
ACT Theater, Seattle, WA. This exhibition was paired with David Mamet's production of 'The Water Engine'.
1979 
Murphy's Design Studio - Ballard WA
1979
Home Savings and Loan - Burien WA
1984
Annie's Affordable Art, Ballard District, Seattle, WA
1987
Scandie's Restaurant Grand Opening, Ballard District, Seattle, WA
1987
Everett Art Council, Everett, WA
1991
Scandie's Restaurant, Ballard District, Seattle, WA
1993
Humanities 101 Gallery, Ballard, WA
1994
Souvenirs of the Soul Gallery, Stanwood, WA
1995
LaConner Microbrewery, LaConner, WA
2002
Klickitat County Art Fair, Goldendale, WA - First Place
2008
Golden Art Gallery, Goldendale, WA - Featured Artist for the Month of 
September
2009 to Present
Columbia Art Gallery, Hood River, OR
2011
The Pines, Hood River, OR
2011
Art Prize, Grand Rapids, MI - Sue's work was in the top 25 out of 1,584 artists.


Sue Krigsberg
Abstract Colorist
The Evolution of an Artist: the Paintings of Sue Krigsberg

 Selected work 1976 - 2016 

It's hard to believe that this solo exhibition is the work of one person, but upon closer observation you can see exactly how Sue Krigsberg's work has evolved over the years. Chunky, earth-tone abstractions that are both subdued and energetic give way to more colorful, gestural organic shapes, which transform into flowing, churning abstractions that look like geology itself, only to shift again into quiet geometric pieces, which mutate into charming and fat, wacky, child-like paintings, only to shift again into complexly layered pieces. Viewing Sue's art as separate bodies of work is possible if you isolate one aesthetic thread. Each collection looks and feels decidedly different, but viewed in chronological sequence it's easy to spot the progression of creative expression. 
At first glance these paintings appear spontaneous, unplanned, naive - in reality this is the work of a late-career artist with astonishingly sophisticated and varied techniques that result in splashy, visually delightful paintings. Like Sue, this work is energetic, youthful, bold, eccentric, informal, original, unpretentious. Alive. 
This exhibition represents a span of 40 years of studio work; and you should see the next painting! It's moved on to the next place. Sue is always moving forward, always experimenting, fearless with color, careful with composition. Her work both addresses her past art and life experiences and foreshadows her next piece, her next personal evolution. It's an exciting, fresh and unusual way to work. 
It was an honor and pleasure to guest curate this show. 

Rene' Westbrook Curator


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